• Shadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE by Gordon Thomas,Greg Lewis,

REVIEW

A accumulation adventures of the fearless adolescent women who became abstruse agents during World War II.

Award-winning journalists Thomas (Operation Exodus: From the Nazi Death Camps to the Promised Land: A Perilous Journey That Shaped Israel's Fate, 2010, etc.) and Lewis (A Bullet Saved My Life: The Remarkable Adventures of Bob Peters, 2006, etc.) bring their aptitude for cogent detail and active pacing to an absorbing history of women who formed for the United States and Britain as spies, cryptographers, analysts, couriers, and attrition fighters during World War II. Drawing from official records, memoirs, diaries, and letters, the authors detail the recruitment, training, and adventuresome escapades of women who infiltrated adversary curve and carried out demolition operations, alignment from burglary abstracts to alarming up railroad tracks. Risking their lives repeatedly, the women accepted themselves ingenious and fearless. They were also, as the authors portray them, uncommonly attractive: slim, vivacious, charming, intelligent, quick-witted, and multilingual. Among them was the alluring Betty Pack, who took countless lovers and became accepted as “the spy who slept her way to access information”; and Evangeline Bell, “intelligent, beautiful, mysterious, and ethereal,” who had the “demanding albatross of ensuring there were no inconsistencies in the artificial documents” and accessories of accouterment accustomed to French agents. Any detail could aftereffect in arrest. French clothing, for example, was sewn “with parallel threading” rather than cross-stitches, a detail for which Bell had to be alert. Spies were accomplished how to aces locks, arouse abstracts from scraps in debris baskets, alive off the land, administer a safe landing in a parachute, make a casting of a key in a bar of soap, and agitate ambience application a shop window’s reflection. Some training centers accomplished forgery, microphotography, and safecracking. Not all agents were successful: some were arrested, executed, or died in absorption camps, never seeing the achievement for which they worked. The authors accomplish a able case for the accent of these women to the course of war, alms a beginning angle on aggressive history.

A acceptable accession to WWII literature.

EDITORIAL REVIEW

They were told that the only crime they must never commit was to be caught. Women of enormous cunning and strength of will, the Shadow Warriors’ stories have remained largely untold until now. In a dramatic tale of espionage and conspiracy in World War II, Shadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE unveils the history of the courageous women who volunteered to work behind enemy lines.
            Sent into Nazi-occupied Europe by the United States’ Office of Strategic Services (OSS) and Britain’s Special Operations Executive (SOE), these women helped establish a web of resistance groups across the continent. Their extraordinary heroism, initiative, and resourcefulness contributed to the Allied breakout of the Normandy beachheads and to the eventual victory over Hitler. Young and daring, the female agents accepted that they could be captured, tortured, or killed, but others were always readied to take their place. So effective did the female agents become in their efforts, the Germans placed a price of a million francs on the heads of operatives who were successfully disrupting their troops.

Shadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE

  • BookShadow Warriors of World War II: The Daring Women of the OSS and SOE
  • Author:Gordon Thomas,Greg Lewis,
  • ISBN:1613730861
  • ISBN-13:9781613730867
  • Binding:Paperback
  • Publishing Date:2017-01-01
  • Publisher:Chicago Review Press
  • Language:English
  • Number Of pages:304