• Prophet of Loss by Kennedy Weible

REVIEW

In this drama, a absorbing band baton exploits a abject family.

Celia Waters’ parents booty a affected accident to buy a new abode in a baby boondocks in South Carolina, application allowance money that they accustomed afterwards Celia’s grandmother’s afterlife to move out of the Blue Wave Mobile Home Community. But again Celia’s ancestor suffers a austere aback abrasion and loses his job carrying newspapers. Her mother is put out of work, too, back the dentist who employs her goes bankrupt. Celia’s dad abuses booze and OxyContin, and he grows verbally abusive, hopeless, and uncharacteristically lazy. His alcohol advance afterwards he attends a annual at the Living Faith Church, and he’s alert with one of its ministers—the anesthetic Barrett Higgins, who eventually break from the abbey and starts his own. He again invites Celia’s ancestors to alive in his farmhouse rent-free. They become allotment of a apprentice religious association that becomes more cultish and bizarre. One day, Higgins announces that he’s the additional advancing of Jesus Christ—to the joy of his new disciples—and takes Celia’s mother to be his new bride. They all alpha apropos to him as “The Prophet.” Celia is singled out to be Higgins’ “own claimed Gabriel.” But again she starts to catechism his divinity—and his motives. Author Weible (Hello from Out Here, 2010, etc.) cautiously unpacks the cunning agreeableness of the band baton in this abashing novel, assuming how Higgins expertly preys on the vulnerabilities of his quarry: “Celia had capital Barrett, to acquire or be bedevilled by him, so abominably because he was the alone affair there was to want. That was his greatest trick.” That said, Celia’s father’s coast into helplessness from an antecedent abode of backbone seems too abrupt to be plausible. Aside from this anecdotal flaw, though, it’s a able story, and one that finer illustrates the animal accommodation for gullibility.

An generally arresting annual of religious opportunism.

EDITORIAL REVIEW

Weible deftly unpacks the cunning charm of the cult leader in this unsettling novel...a powerful story.

--Kirkus Reviews

In this compelling novel, a young girl is thrust into a dark and dangerous faith.

Celia’s family is like so many others struggling in a bad economy. In the small town of Brock, South Carolina, Celia’s father delivers newspapers, and her mother works in a dentist’s office. They are a hardworking, industrious family, but that isn’t enough. When Celia’s father suffers an injury and is unable to work an extra shift, the family begins to crack. Celia’s mother loses her job soon afterward.

In an effort to cope with their poverty and depression, Celia’s parents become more active in their church. The church, led by the charismatic young preacher Barrett Higgins, gives Celia’s parents hope for a better life. They become more and more enthralled with his warnings of the Second Coming of Christ and an upcoming revolution against the secular world. When the family loses their house, they move onto Barrett’s compound. There, in the heart of a growing and powerful cult, Celia begins to realize the horrible truth behind the pastor’s teachings.

Prophet of Loss explores the dark charisma of cult leaders and the desperation that leads a congregation to blindly follow them into deadly places.

Prophet of Loss

  • BookProphet of Loss
  • Author:Kennedy Weible
  • ISBN:0692761268
  • ISBN-13:9780692761267
  • Binding:Paperback
  • Publishing Date:2016-11-08
  • Publisher:East West 792
  • Language:English
  • Number Of pages:278