• Not Dead Yet: The Memoir by Phil Collins

REVIEW

Of beat-keeping, boozing, and stardom: Genesis bagman and abandoned brilliant Collins tells…well, article abutting all. Two things are axiomatic from the alpha of this affable bout of a activity in pop music. The aboriginal is that the columnist is a somewhat afraid star, animated of the successes of others and afraid of his own: “I ha[d] to chase a abandoned anthology that wasn’t meant to be an album, far beneath a hit,” he writes of his aboriginal 1980s breakthrough. “Writing addition may not be a assignment I’m up to.” The additional is that Collins is a faithful fan of rock, accepting aboriginal tasted it as an added on the set of the Beatles’ 1964 cine A Hard Day’s Night, his arena larboard on the cutting-room attic for affidavit he winningly explains. Throughout, the columnist skirts some of the breakable issues that bankrupt up the monster bandage Genesis, sending Peter Gabriel to a abandoned career and Collins from the drummer’s stool to centermost date as advance singer. Aback he criticizes, it is mostly himself in the cantankerous hairs, and aback he writes of the dynamics adored in a alliance some years back, it is gingerly: “Peter will therefore, unavoidably, booty allegation of some aspects of the operation. And with the best will in the world, there ability be some acerbity from some abode at this.” Collins writes with acuteness of his alcoholism and shrugs off some of the all-overs that propelled his better hits. “If I was activity that abundant affliction night afterwards night,” he writes, “I’d be a crackpot.” And he doesn’t affair his horn overmuch, admitting anyone who can accept to The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway after actuality confused and acclimatized has no soul. As for “Sussudio,” granted, not so much…. Though after the abrupt carrion of Keith Richards’ Activity or the raw balladry of Bruce Springsteen’s Born to Run, this is a adorable access in the pop-confessional genre.

EDITORIAL REVIEW

Phil Collins pulls no punches—about himself, his life, or the ecstasy and heartbreak that’s inspired his music. In his much-awaited memoir, Not Dead Yet, he tells the story of his epic career, with an auspicious debut at age 11 in a crowd shot from the Beatles’ legendary film A Hard Day’s Night. A drummer since almost before he could walk, Collins received on the job training in the seedy, thrilling bars and clubs of 1960s swinging London before finally landing the drum seat in Genesis. Soon, he would step into the spotlight on vocals after the departure of Peter Gabriel and begin to stockpile the songs that would rocket him to international fame with the release of Face Value and “In the Air Tonight.” Whether he’s recalling jamming with Eric Clapton and Robert Plant, pulling together a big band fronted by Tony Bennett, or writing the music for Disney’s smash-hit animated Tarzan, Collins’s storytelling chops never waver. And of course he answers the pressing question on everyone’s mind: just what does “Sussudio” mean?
 
Not Dead Yet is Phil Collins’s candid, witty, unvarnished story of the songs and shows, the hits and pans, his marriages and divorces, the ascents to the top of the charts and into the tabloid headlines. As one of only three musicians to sell 100 million records both in a group and as a solo artist, Collins breathes rare air, but has never lost his touch at crafting songs from the heart that touch listeners around the globe. That same touch is on magnificent display here, especially as he unfolds his harrowing descent into darkness after his “official” retirement in 2007, and the profound, enduring love that helped save him. This is Phil Collins as you’ve always known him, but also as you’ve never heard him before.

Not Dead Yet: The Memoir

  • BookNot Dead Yet: The Memoir
  • Author:Phil Collins
  • ISBN:1101907479
  • ISBN-13:9781101907474
  • Binding:Paperback
  • Publishing Date:2016-10-25
  • Publisher:Crown Archetype
  • Language:English
  • Number Of pages:384